File and Folder Interaction

Your SenseTalk scripts can interact with files and file system objects in a variety of ways. For instance, you can read stored data from a file on the local machine, then use that data to perform additional actions. In most cases, we recommend using the first method, described below in Accessing a File as a Container, for reading and writing to files.

Note: SenseTalk commands and functions for working with files and file system objects operate on the local machine rather than on a system under test (SUT).

If you want to access file and file system information, see File and Folder References.

Note: As a best practice, any files referenced within a SenseTalk script should be added to Eggplant Functional through the Resources pane in the Suite window. This method stores files to the Resources directory within the suite directory for the given suite. Although SenseTalk can access files stored elsewhere on the local file system, using the Resources directory provides additional capabilities. See the Resources Pane for more information.

Accessing a File as a Container

The simplest way to work with the contents of a file is to access the file directly as a SenseTalk container. Using this approach, you can read an entire file with a single command:

put file "/etc/passwd" into passwordInfo

You can write a file just as easily:

put "0,0,0,0" into file "/tmp/testing/counters"

The command above creates a file named counters in the directory /tmp/testing and writes the value 0,0,0,0 into it. If the /tmp/testing directory does not exist, it is also created. If there is already a file /tmp/testing/counters, its previous contents are completely replaced by the new value, so be careful when using this approach.

You can also access any part of the text in a file by using chunk expressions:

add 1 to item 2 of line 1 of file "/tmp/testing/counters"

This command reads the current contents of the file, adds 1 to the second item on the first line, and stores the modified value back into the file.

The following example shows how you could use this method to read an entire file, one line at a time:

put file "/Users/bob/Desktop/TestRead" into MyFileVar

repeat the number of lines of MyFileVar times

put line repeatindex() of MyFileVar into output

log output

end repeat

Although this example only logs each line after it is read, you could instead add code to perform additional actions with the content, which here is stored into the variable output.

If a command attempts to write to a file and fails for some reason (such as insufficient privileges for writing to the file), the result is set to an error message. The value of the result is also set to an error message when reading a file as a container if the file does not exist or cannot be accessed. The value of the file expression is treated as empty in this case.

Treating a file as a container is easy and works well for many situations. Occasionally, it might not be the most efficient approach to use if your script needs to do a significant amount of reading or writing in a file. In these cases, you might prefer to use the commands described below in Commands and Functions for Working with Files.

Configuring File Behavior

When accessing a file as a container, text is interpreted during both reading and writing according to the setting of the defaultStringEncoding global property. By default, SenseTalk uses UTF-8, a common 8-bit system for encoding Unicode characters. To read or write a file as binary data instead of as text, specify as data:

put file "/tmp/datafile" as data into myData

put contents as data into file "/tmp/binaryFile"

When your SenseTalk command creates a new file, you can control the access permissions for the file as well as access to any folder created in the directory structure. See the umask global property for complete details about reading or setting these properties.

You can use the strictFiles global property to control the behavior when reading a nonexistent file as a container. The default is false, which means the nonexistent files are treated as empty. Set this property to true if you want to throw an exception if the file doesn't exist.

Commands and Functions for Working with Files

The file input and output commands (open file, close file, read from file, seek in file, and write to file) are for creating and accessing text or binary files on your system. Use them to read and write data that is stored in the file system.

In addition to using these commands, you can access a file directly as a container within your script, as described above. Accessing a file as a container provides the simplest means of reading or manipulating its contents, but provides less control and is somewhat less efficient when performing multiple operations on the same file than the commands described here.

Open File Command

Behavior: Opens or creates a file for reading or writing or both. The open file command must be used to open a file before anything can be read from or written to that file with the read or write commands. When you are finished with a file, you should close it by using either the close file or close all command.

Parameters: The name of a file to open or create.

Syntax:

open file fileName { for [reading | writing | readwrite | appending | updating] }

If the fileName expression does not yield the name of an existing file, the file will be created. If fileName is not an absolute path, it is assumed to be relative to the current working folder.

Example:

open file myFile

Example:

Open file "/etc/passwd" for reading

Example:

put "/Users/bkwins/Desktop/testfolder1/testfile.txt" into MyFileVar

open file MyFileVar for appending

Tip: When you open a file, you can optionally specify the manner in which the file will be accessed. You can open files for reading only, for writing only, or for both reading and writing. The default mode is updating if you don't specify the manner of access.

The following table lists the modes and summarizes the differences between them:

Mode

Can Read

Write / Create

Starts At

Existing File

Reading

yes

no

beginning

unchanged

Writing

no

yes

beginning

replaces existing file

ReadWrite

yes

yes

beginning

truncates after highest write

Appending

yes

yes

end of file

never truncated; may grow

Updating

yes

yes

beginning

never truncated; may grow

All of the modes except for reading will create the file (including the full path to it) if it doesn’t already exist.

The readwrite, appending, and updating modes all open the file for both reading and writing. However, a file opened in readwrite mode will be truncated following the last (highest) character position in the file that is written to. If nothing is written to the file, it will be left unchanged.

Tip: If you want to open a file only if it already exists, you can check for its existence by using file fileName exists or there is a file fileName as shown in this example:

if there is a file myFile then

open file myFile for updating

else

answer "File " & myFile & " doesn't exist!"

exit all

end if

Related:

Close File, Close All Files Commands

Behavior: The close file command closes an open file that was opened with the open file command. The close all files command closes all open files that were opened with the open file command. Use the close file command when your script has finished accessing a file, or use the close all files command to close all of the currently open files.

Note: SenseTalk automatically closes all open files whenever it stops executing your scripts, but it is a good practice for your script to close files when it is done working with them.

Parameters: For close file, the name of a file to close is required. The close all files command does not take a parameter.

Syntax:

close file fileName

close all { files }

The fileName should be an expression that gives the name of the file to be closed. The file name should be either the full path name of the file, or it should be given relative to the current working folder (as returned by the folder).

Example:

close file "/etc/passwd"

Example:

close all files -- closes all open files that were opened with the open files command

Tip: The close all files command closes all currently open files, regardless of which script or handler opened the file. This behavior could be potentially problematic if files have been opened by other scripts and are still in use. You can use the openFiles() function to get a list of all open files.

Related:

  • open file: Use this command to open a specified file.
  • openFiles(): Use this function to get a list of all files that are currently open.

Current Position in File Function

Behavior: Obtains the position of the next byte within an open file that will be read or written. Position 1 represents the beginning of the file.

Syntax:

get the current position in file filename

Example:

get the current position in file myFile

Read from File Command

Behavior: Use the read from file command to read data from a file. Note that the file must first be opened with the open file command. Data is read into the variable it or into a destination container if specified (using an into clause).

The read from file command can read a specified number of characters, words, items, lines, or bytes; can read until a specified delimiter is found; or can read a list of one of several different types of numeric values. Reading begins at the current position, or at a starting position specified by using an at clause.

When there is no more data to read, the destination container will be empty. Any time less data is read than was requested, the result function will contain a value giving the reason (such as time out, or eof if the end of file is reached).

Parameters: The name of a file that was previously opened with an open file command. The file must have been opened in a mode that permits reading (that is, not in writing mode, which permits only writing).

Syntax:

read from file fileName { at startpos } { into container } { until [terminator | eof | end] } { {for} quantity {dataType} }

The syntax of the read command is flexible, allowing the various options to be specified in any convenient order.

Use at startpos to specify the byte position within the file where the read from file command starts reading. If the startpos value is a negative number, it specifies the number of bytes back from the end of the file where reading begins. If you don't specify an at startpos value, the first character or byte to be read is the one at the current position in the file, as determined by the most recent prior read, write, or seek command in that file.

If into container is specified, the data that is read is put into the given container. If an into option is not specified, the data is read into the special it variable.

If until terminator is specified, all of the characters from the starting position until the next occurrence of the specified character or string will be read. This option is useful for reading one line at a time from the source (by using return as the terminating character), or to read until some other delimiting character (such as a tab) is found. The terminator can be more than one character in length, and will be returned as part of the value that was read. Specifying until eof or until end will read to the end of the file.

If for quantity dataType is used, the number of characters or other data elements specified by quantity are read from the file. If dataType is a text chunk type (i.e., characters, words, items, or lines), text is read until the requested amount is available. The final delimiter (if any) is not included with the text that is read. If no dataType is given, bytes are assumed (and the word for is required in this case).

If you specify a numeric data type instead of a text chunk type, the value stored into it or container by the read will be a list of the data values that were read. The following numeric data types can be used:

Data Type

Value

int1 or 8-bit integer

an 8-bit (or 1 byte) signed integer

uint1 or unsigned 8-bit integer

an 8-bit (or 1 byte) unsigned integer

int2 or 16-bit integer or short integer

a 16-bit (or 2 byte) signed integer

uint2 or unsigned 16-bit integer

a 16-bit (or 2 byte) unsigned integer

int4 or 32-bit integer or integer

a 32-bit (or 4 byte) signed integer

uint4 or unsigned 32-bit integer

a 32-bit (or 4 byte) unsigned integer

int8 or 64-bit integer

a 64-bit (or 8 byte) signed integer

uint8 or unsigned 64-bit integer

a 64-bit (or 8 byte) unsigned integer

real4 or 32-bit real or float

a 32-bit (single-precision) floating-point number

real8 or 64-bit real or double

a 64-bit (double-precision) floating-point number

Example:

read from file myFile for 20 -- Reads the next 20 bytes into item

Example:

read from file myFile into myFileVar until return -- Reads the first line and puts it into a variable

Example:

read 100 characters from file xyz into input -- Reads the next 100 chars into input

Example:

read into inQueue 5 items from file dataFile at 100 -- Starting at position 100 (100th byte), reads 5 items and puts them in the variable inQueue

Tip: Here is an example showing one way to read and process an entire file:

open file "/tmp/abcd"

repeat forever

read from file "/tmp/abcd" until return -- reads one line

if it is empty then exit repeat -- we've reached the end of the file

put it -- or do other processing with 'it' here

end repeat

close file "/tmp/abcd"

Related:

Seek in File Command

Behavior: Sets the position within a file where the next read or write command will occur. Use the seek command to set the current position in a file before performing a read or write in that file. Although the read and write commands both provide at startpos options to specify the starting position for that operation, the seek command provides additional flexibility because the position in the file can be specified relative to the current location as well as from the beginning or end of the file.

Parameters: The name of a file that was previously opened with an open file command.

Syntax:

seek in file fileName [at | to] position { from | before | after {the} [start | beginning | current position | end] }

The position is a numeric expression that specifies the location to seek to in the file. If you don't use one of the from options to specify the origin of the seek, then a positive position indicates the number of bytes from the beginning of the file, and a negative position indicates the number of bytes back from the end of the file. Instead of a number or numeric expression, position can also be the end, which means the same as

seek in file ... to 0 from the end

You can include a from option to specify whether position is relative to the beginning or end of the file or from the current position. You can include before or after to specify the position to search.

Example:

seek in file myFile to 10 from the current position

Example:

seek in file "/Users/bkwins/Documents/newText" to the end

Example:

seek in file myFile to 8 bytes before the current position

Related:

  • read from file: Use read from file to read text or data from an open file.
  • write to file: Use this command to write text or data to an open file.

Write to File Command

Behavior: Writes data into a file. Use the write command to store data in a file on disk. The data can then be read from the file again at a later time by your scripts, or by another application entirely.

Parameters: The name of a file that was previously opened with an open file command. The file must have been opened in a mode that permits writing (that is, not in reading mode, which permits only reading).

Syntax:

write data {as dataType} to file fileName {at [startpos | end | eof]}

The data can be any valid SenseTalk expression. If dataType is not specified, the value of the data expression is treated as a string of characters, which is written out to the specified file.

If at startpos is specified, writing to the file begins at that byte position within the file. If the startpos value is negative, it specifies the number of bytes back from the end of the file where writing begins. Using the at end or at eof option tells SenseTalk to write the data at the end of the file, following any other text already in the file. If no location is specified, data is written beginning at the current position in the file, as determined by the most recent prior read, write, or seek command in that file.

If as dataType is specified, the data is converted to that binary format before being written. In this case, data can be a list of numeric values, which are all converted to the same data type. See the read from file command for a list of the valid data types.

Example:

write line 1 of accounts & return to file myFile

Example:

write highScore & tab to file "~/.gamescores" at eof

Example:

write numberList as 16-bit integers to file bData

Example:

put "/Users/bob/Desktop/TestRead" into MyFileVar // creates a variable with a path to a file

open file MyFileVar // opens the file

put "GIO NOW" into MyWrite // puts a text string into a variable

write return to file MyFileVar at eof // adds a return character to the end of the file to ensure that new writes begin on a new line

write MyWrite to file MyFileVar // writes the text from the variable into the file

close file MyFileVar // closes the file

Tip: Writing into a file at a position that already contains data overwrites the existing data. To insert text into the middle of an existing file, you must read all of the text in the file from that point to the end and store it in a container. Then the text to be inserted can be written out, followed by the stored text.
Tip: If an existing file is opened in readwrite or appending mode, writing to the file causes data to be dropped from the file beyond the highest position that gets written to in the file. To avoid this file truncation, open the file in updating mode. See the open file command for more information about these modes.
Tip: When you are finished accessing a file, it should be closed with the close file command to ensure that all of the data written out is saved properly to the disk.

Related:

OpenFiles Function

Behavior: Returns a list of the files that are currently open as a result of the open file command.

Parameters: None.

Syntax:

the openFiles

openFiles()

Example:

log the openFiles

Example:

open file "/Users/bkwins/Documents/newText"

put openFiles() into myVar

log myVar

Tip: You could use openFiles() to perform actions on only certain open files. For instance, the following example shows how you might use the information returned by the funtion to close all open files whose names end in .dat.

Example:

repeat with each item of the openFiles

if it ends with ".dat" then close file it

end repeat

Related:

Commands and Functions for Working with File Systems

Several commands and functions provide access to the file system on the machine where the script is running (or a locally mounted file system), enabling your script to create, move, copy, rename, and delete files and folders, and to obtain information about the files and folders in the system.

Create File, Create Folder, Create Link Commands

Behavior: Creates a new file or folder in the file system, or a symbolic link to an existing file or folder. Use the create folder command to create a new folder on the disk. Use the create file command to create an empty file. Use create link to create a link (sometimes called an alias or a symbolic link) that looks like an independent file, but is actually a reference to a different file on the disk.

Note: You can also create a file by using the open file command for a file that doesn't exist, or by using the put command to put something into a file that doesn't exist. Both methods create the file as well as any specified directory structure.

Parameters: For create file and create folder, the name of the file or folder to create is required. For create link, the name of the link and the name of the file or folder to link to are required.

Syntax:

create {a} {new} [file | folder | directory] fileOrFolderName {with properties}

create {a} {new} link linkName to [file | folder | directory] fileOrFolderName

The fileOrFolderName expression must yield either an absolute path name or a path name relative to the current folder. The file, folder, or link being created must not already exist. If its parent folder does not exist, it will also be created.

If the with properties option is used, properties should be a property list specifying initial values for any of the following properties: ownerName, groupName, permissions, creationDate, modificationDate, and for files: typeCode, creatorCode, fileExtensionHidden, appendOnly, or locked. See Accessing File Properties for more information about setting these properties.

Example:

create file "/tmp/myWorkArea/testData"

Example:

create a new folder "/tmp/myWorkArea"

Example:

create folder "/tmp/myWorkArea/subdir" with (groupName:"admin", permissions:"rwxrwxr-x")

Example:

create link "tasty" to file "juicy"

Tip: If the command fails, the result() function will be set to return a non-empty value indicating the error.

Delete File, Delete Folder Commands

Behavior: Permanently removes a file or folder from the disk. Use the delete command to destroy a file, or to destroy a folder including all of its contents. This command is permanent and irreversible—use with caution.

Parameters: The name of a file or folder to delete.

Syntax:

delete [file | folder | directory] fileOrFolderName

The fileOrFolderName expression must yield the name of an existing file or folder. Deleting a folder deletes all of the files and folders within it as well.

Example:

delete file "testData27"

Example:

delete folder "/tmp/myWorkArea"

Tip: If the command fails, the result() function will be set to return a non-empty value indicating the error.

Rename File, Rename Folder Commands

Behavior: Use the rename command to change the name of a file or folder.

Parameters: The name of the file whose name you want to change, and the new name for the file are both required.

Syntax:

rename [file | folder | directory] originalName as newName

The originalName expression must yield the name of an existing file or folder. If newName is not a full path name, it is taken to be relative to the folder where the source file or folder is located.

Example:

rename folder "/tmp/myWorkArea" as "oldWorkArea"

Example:

rename file sourceFile as sourceFile && "backup"

Tip: If the command fails, the result function will be set to return a non-empty value indicating the error.

Copy File, Copy Folder Commands

Behavior: Makes a duplicate copy of an existing file or folder. Use the copy command any time you want to make a complete copy of a single file or of a folder and all of its contents.

There are three forms of the copy command: copy ... into ..., copy ... as ..., and copy ... to .... The first form, using the preposition into, makes a copy of the source file or folder with the same name as the original in a different destination folder. If the destination folder does not exist, it will be created.

The second form of copy, using the preposition as, lets you assign a different name to the copy. The copy can be created in the same folder as the source, or in a different folder. The final form of copy, using the preposition to, behaves just like copy ... into ... if the destination is an existing folder, otherwise it behaves like copy ... as ... .

Parameters: The name of a file to copy is required. Either a new name or new destination for the copy is also required.

Syntax:

copy [file | folder | directory] sourceName [into | to] {folder | directory} destinationFolder

copy [file | folder | directory] sourceName [as | to] destinationName

The sourceName expression must yield the name of an existing file or folder. If sourceName is not an absolute path, it is assumed to be relative to the current working folder. If the destinationFolder or destinationName is not an absolute path, it is assumed to be relative to the parent directory of the source file or folder.

Example:

copy file results into folder resultsArchiveFolder

Example:

copy file "/tmp/testFile" as "/tmp/testFileCopy"

Example:

copy folder planFldr to "~/Documents"

Tip: If the command fails, the result function will be set to return a non-empty value indicating the error.

Move File, Move Folder Commands

Behaviors: Moves a file or folder to a new location in the file system. Use the move ... into ... command to move a file or folder into a different parent folder without changing its name. The move ... to ... command (similar to the copy ... to ... command) assigns a new name to the file or folder being moved unless the destination is an existing folder, in which case the source file or folder is moved into the destination folder without changing its name.

Parameters: The name of a file or folder to move and the name of the destination are both required.

Syntax:

move [file | folder | directory] sourceName [into | to] {folder | directory} destinationFolder

If sourceName is not an absolute path, it is assumed to be relative to the current working folder. If the destinationFolder is not an absolute path, it is taken to be relative to the parent folder of the source file or folder. If the destinationFolder does not exist, it will be created.

Example:

move file "/tmp/testFile" into folder "archives"

Tip: If the move command fails, the result function will be set to return a non-empty value indicating the error.

Files Function

Behavior: Returns a list of all of the files in the current working folder, or in a specified folder. Use the files function to find out what files exist in a given folder in the file system.

Parameters: If the files function is called without any parameter (or with an empty parameter), it returns a list of files in the current working folder. If a parameter is given, it should be the name of an existing folder, and the function returns the list of files in that folder.

Syntax:

the files {of folder}

files(folder)

Returns: A list containing one item for each of the non-folder entries in the specified folder (or in the current working folder if no folder is specified). Each item in the returned list is a fileDescription object (a property list with objectType set to fileDescription). The asText property of each fileDescription is set to the local name of the file, so displaying it simply shows the file’s name.

Example:

put files("/Users/bkwins/Desktop")

Example:

put the files of "/Users/bkwins/Desktop"

Tip: You can easily iterate over all of the files in the list returned by the files function to work with each file in turn. The following example shows such a use case where you might want to back up only certain file types.

Example:

// backup all ".st" files into backupFolder

repeat with each item of the files -- looks at all files in working folder

if it ends with ".st" then copy file it into backupFolder

else put "Not backed up: " & it & " of size" & it.NSFileSize

end repeat

Tech Talk

Each fileDescription object also holds many additional items of information. In particular, the “long name” property contains the full path name of the file. Other properties include the parent folder where the file is located, and such information as the file size, owner, and permissions. Use the keys() function (or delete the object’s asText property before displaying it) to find out exactly what information is available.

SenseTalk commands and functions that work with files, such as the copy file and rename commands and the diskSpace() function, recognize fileDescription objects that are used in place of file names, and will use the long name to identify the actual file. In this way, fileDescription objects can serve as file identifiers that can be stored in variables, passed as parameters, and so forth.

Folders Function

Behavior: Returns a list of all the subfolders in the current working folder, or in a specified folder. Use the folders function to find out what folders exist within a given folder in the file system.

Parameters: If the folders function is called without any parameter, it returns a list of folders in the current working folder. If a parameter is given, it should be the name of an existing folder, and the function returns the list of subfolders within that folder.

Syntax:

the folders {of parentFolder}

folders(parentFolder)

The parentFolder expression must yield the name of an existing folder.

Returns:  A list containing one item for each of the subfolder entries in parentFolder (or in the current working folder, if parentFolder is not specified).

Example:

log folders() // logs all folders in the current working directory

Example:

put the folders of "/Users/bkwins/Desktop/" into myFolderListVar // puts a list of folders on the Desktop into a variable

Tip: You can easily iterate over all of the folders in the list returned by the folders function and work with each folder in turn. For instance, you could use the code in the following example to show all the individual files within each subfolder of a folder.

Example:

// show the files in each subfolder of the current folder

repeat with each item of the folders

put "Folder " & it & return & the files of it

end repeat

Tech Talk

Each item in the returned list is a fileDescription object (property list) which shows the local name of the folder when displayed, but also contains many additional items of information about the folder, such as its modification date and permissions settings. See the files function, above, or the fileDescription function for more information about fileDescription objects.

FilesAndFolders Function

Behavior: Returns a list of all files and subfolders in the current working folder, or in a specified folder. Use the filesAndFolders function to find out what files and folders exist within a given folder in the file system.

Parameters: If the filesAndFolders function is called without any parameter, it returns a list of files and folders in the current working folder. If a parameter is given, it should be the name of an existing folder, and the function returns the list of files and subfolders within that folder.

Syntax:

the filesAndFolders {of parentFolder}

filesAndFolders(parentFolder)

The parentFolder expression must yield the name of an existing folder.

Returns: A list containing one item for each of the file and subfolder entries in parentFolder (or in the current working folder if parentFolder is not specified).

Example:

log filesandfolders() // logs all files and folders in the current working directory

Example:

put the filesandfolders of "/Users/bkwins/Desktop/" into folderContents // puts a list of files and folders on the Desktop into a variable

Tip: You can easily iterate over all of the items in the list returned by the function to work with each file or folder in turn. The following example shows how you could process each item, treating files and folders differently.

Example:

// show the files in the current folder and its subfolders

repeat with each item of the filesAndFolders

if it is a folder then

put "Folder: " & it & " -- " & the files of it

else

put "File: " & it

end if

end repeat

Tech Talk

Each item in the returned list is a fileDescription object (property list) that shows the local name of the file or folder when displayed, but also contains many additional items of information about that item, such as its modification date and permissions settings. See the files function, above, or the fileDescription function for more information about fileDescription objects.

availableStringEncodings() Function

Behavior: Returns a list of the names of all the available string encoding formats. In some cases there might be more than one name for the same encoding. Use the availableStringEncodings() function to learn the names of the encodings that are available to use when setting the defaultStringEncoding global property.

Syntax:

the availableStringEncodings

availableStringEncodings()

Example:

put the availableStringEncodings

Functions for Working with CSV Formats

During your SenseTalk scripting you might need to do some formatting of CSV data. SenseTalk includes the CSVFormat() function and the CSVValue() function to assist you with CSV formats.

CSVFormat() Function

Behavior: This function accepts a value, which is either a list of lists or a list of property lists, and returns a text representation of that list in CSV format.

Parameters: The CSVFormat() function uses the following parameters:

  • delimiter: The delimiter parameter value represents a character to be used between the fields on each line. The default value is a comma.
  • columnNames: A list of the column names.

Syntax:

CSVFormat(list of lists | property list, <parameter1Name>:<parameter1Value>, <parameter2Name>:<parameter2Value>))

Example:

put {"id","LName","FName", "Address","City","State","Zip"} into colNames // Adds header names to a list

put CSVFormat((colNames, customer1, customer2, customer3))

// Outputs the header names that were added to the colNames list and the current values contained in customer1, customer2, and customer3, all in CSV format:

// id,LName,FName,Address,City,State,Zip

// 1,Smith,Joe,123 Happy Place,Boulder,CO,80303

// 2,Jones,Mary,456 Happy Place,Boulder,CO,80303

// 3,Brown,James,456 Happy Place,Boulder,CO,80303

CSVValue() Function

Behavior: This function accepts text in CSV format and converts it into either a list of property lists or a list of lists.

Parameters: The CSVValue() function uses the following parameters:

  • delimiter: The delimiter parameter value represents a character to be used between the fields on each line. The default value is a comma.
  • asLists: Setting the asLists parameter value to Yes tells the CSVValue() function to create a list of lists. The default value is No, which results in the creation of a list of property lists.
  • columnNames: The columnNames parameter represents a list of names for the columns. Specify this parameter when there is no header row. The CSVValue() function ignores this parameter if the asLists parameter is set.
  • trimValues: Set this value to Yes to trim any spaces before and after each value. The default value is No.
  • ignoreComments: Set this value to Yes to recognize and ignore comments beginning with the # character. The default value is No.
  • allowEscapes: Set this value to Yes to allow backslashes in values to escape the character that follows the backslash. The default value is No.

Syntax:

CSVValue(CSVstringToEvaluate, <parameter1Name>:<parameter1Value>, <parameter2Name>:<parameter2Value>,...<parameterNName>:<parameterNValue>))

Example:

put CSVValue of file ResourcePath("TestCustomerList_CSV.csv") into Customers // Reads a list of customers from the TestCustomerList_CSV.csv file and places them in the Customers list

repeat for each item of Customers

put it // Displays each item contained in the Customers list

end repeat

// Outputs the following items from the Customers list (these contents are the assumed TestCustomerList_CSV.csv file contents for this example) :

// (City:"New York", @"Company Name":"ABC", Country:"United States", @"Customer ID":"2", @"Postal Code":"12345", State:"New York")

// (City:"Seattle", @"Company Name":"XYZ", Country:"United States", @"Customer ID":"3", @"Postal Code":"12345", State:"Washington")

Related:

Related Global Properties

SenseTalk includes a few global properties that affect work with files and file system objects.

To provide stricter control over the use of files at runtime, the strictFiles global property can be used to determine whether an attempt to read a nonexistent file returns an empty value (the default) or an exception.

You can use the defaultStringEncoding to specify how text strings are encoded when they are read from or written to a file, socket, or URL. The default method is UTF8, but many other encoding methods can be used.

You can use the umask global property to control the access permissions for any file or folder created by SenseTalk, either directly or indirectly.

These properties are each described in detail on Local and Global Properties for Files and File Systems:

 

This topic was last updated on May 14, 2019, at 02:41:10 PM.

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